Should driving be taught in schools?

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Almost half of under-25s think that driving should be taught in schools according to a recent study of over 1,000 motorists.

 

The study, conducted by Young Driver, found that 44% of under-25s thought that driving lessons should be added to the school curriculum. 

 

39% of under-25s also believed that being unable to drive closes ‘avenues of opportunity’ for young people. 19% said that they wouldn’t be able to do their job if they didn’t have a driving licence. 

 

As well as demonstrating that young motorists considered a driving licence considered as a practical skill, the study also showed the confidence boost of being able to drive. More than half of those surveyed (53%) agreeing that it lifted their confidence, and 44% saying that driving gave them self-confidence they wouldn’t otherwise have. 

 

Last year, the AA Charitable Trust conducted a survey of over 17,000 drivers and found that in terms of life experience, teenagers in care value driving licences as much as marriage or a university degrees. 15% of 18-24 year olds said it was the most valuable life experience, while 12% said they thought marriage was the most valuable life experience and another 12% said a degree was most valuable. 

 

Marketing manager at Young Driver, Laura White, said the results of the study show the importance of driving beyond it’s practical application.With concerns around young people’s mental health in our current climate, activities that improve confidence and self-esteem are incredibly important to wellbeing and mental health.

 

“Driving is a useful skill, which can open up a world of opportunities which might otherwise be impossible,” she said. “But even beyond that, it also has the ability to give people a sense of freedom and confidence. 65% of the drivers we questioned said they enjoyed the feeling of freedom driving gave them, and our research also showed it gave people self-confidence they wouldn’t otherwise have.

 

“Youngsters get a massive boost when they know they’re controlling a car safely and can tackle a manoeuvre that even parents might struggle with. As our research shows, it can be hard for young people to get that self-confidence in the modern world, but this is something they can feel a real, genuine sense of achievement at.”

 

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